Arrival

If after reading my last post, you were fretting like me, I just wanted to write to reassure you that my stamps have arrived. In fact, they arrived just one day apart.

I must say that it was wonderful to receive the stamps and place them in my albums. It is akin to finishing a jigsaw puzzle when I put the last stamp in its mount on the page, or get the last stamp in a country for my 1970’s collection.

Waiting for My Stamps

Kuwait 513-514 MNH (1970)

In the past month, I have pulled the trigger on a couple of stamp purchases. One was from a prominent stamp site and the other was from a bulletin board site. In both cases, I am still waiting for my stamps. I don’t write this to complain. I am confident in both sellers and know that they have done their part. It’s just that the mail is so slow right now.

Thanks to a layoff, I have lots of time to contemplate my stamp collection, but very little money to do anything about it. With so much uncertainty, it is nice to have my collection, but also a little frustrating.

Of these purchases, one was meant to fill up spaces in my Canadian album. I am doing a good job of collecting the affordable stamps from Canada, and will probably be left with the ones I might not be able to afford soon. In reality, that will mean either getting lower quality stamps, or a slow pace of filling the album. Neither is terrible and only time will tell what I choose.

The other purchase focuses on completing my 1970 collection. I still have a long way to go, but I am truly enjoying this project. 1970 is a great year for stamps. I completed the countries of Finland and Australia. I also added stamps from Iraq and Kuwait among others. Actually, I ordered them. They still haven’t arrived, but there is always today…..

Reading Material

Perhaps it was a coincidence, or perhaps the universe planned it that way. Just as I finished reading Lawrence Block’s book Generally Speaking (a collection of his columns from Linn’s Stamp Magazine) my girlfriend gave me a delayed Christmas present (thank you Amazon) of this book.

I am quite excited to dive in and read it. If I manage to do so, it will be the first book I start (and hopefully finish) in 2021, I have several books that were held over from last year (including Block’s) but I have cleared off all of them except one.

I have a number of books on my Amazon wish list that I want to read, but this is the first anyone has ever bought for me. Perhaps my other family members do not understand the pursuit of philately as well as my girlfriend. Perhaps, my girlfriend is the only one who listens to me.

I enjoyed the Block book, but I think I would have enjoyed the monthly columns more. I cannot find a copy of LInn’s in the GTA (Greater Toronto Area) and can’t fork over that much money for a subscription without ever seeing a sample copy–I asked, but they were unwilling. I am saving my money for stamps. I would recommend the book.

After Midnight

I found myself staying up very late last night thinking about buying stamps. I am still working on my 1970’s project and I got caught in a trap of comparing various sellers and their shipping fees. If I am going to buy a bunch of stamps, I want to pay the least possible. I also want to get as complete a collection from a country as possible. There’s nothing worse than getting the whole country except for one or two stamps.

It is funny how some sellers charge a couple of cents for each new purchase whereas others charge 50 cents an item. That would certainly add up. I don’t begrudge them the money–it is a business after all. However, I think that fee should be for every ten new items or so.

It was fun searching, but I didn’t pull the trigger on any deals.

Christmas Philately…..sort of

Christmas only brought one new philatelic item. A few books were on my list, as were subscriptions to magazines I shouldn’t collect. What did appear for this boy who was somewhere between naughty and nice was a new magnifying glass. Growing up a magnifying glass was mostly used to burn holes in wood and paper, so having one for my stamps seems novel.

I also took the time to assemble a shelf in my spare room. I will devote several shelves to my stamps, as well as my study of Japanese, and a few travel souvenirs. It isn’t organized yet, but hopefully by tomorrow or the next day. Having seen some fantastic stamp rooms, I am envious.

I haven’t made many stamp purchases as Christmas and purchasing my cycling trainer took precedence. I am also hoping that the new year will once again provide us with stamp shows and other opportunities to enjoy the hobby.

Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays. Also, Happy New Year and hoping it is better in all respects.

What philatelic items did you receive or purchase for yourself?

A Book I Have Started Reading

This is not a book review. For it to be a book review, I would have finished the entire book. I haven’t done that yet. I will do that, I just haven’t done that yet. Instead, this is a book introduction.

Anyone who has read some of the previous posts knows that the writing of Lawrence Block got me into stamp collecting. He made it sound interesting again. He wasn’t wrong. I am enjoying the hobby and enjoying that it comes and goes in spurts. I am interested in it for months and then there are months that my attention is diverted elsewhere. You can probably already tell that by the frequency in which I write these posts.

I discovered quite by accident that Mr. Block wrote a column for Linn’s Stamp News for some three years. I had heard of the magazine in his books about Keller the stamp collecting assassin, but never actually read one of them. I checked into a subscription, but never got beyond that. I discovered this book while coasting around Amazon. I search Amazon and YouTube in much the same way. I find lots of cool stuff, but I never know how I got there. That’s why my wish list and my watch later areas are full of stuff.

I’ve read about a quarter of the book and I am enjoying it much like I enjoyed the Keller books. Mr. Block has a straightforward style that is compelling. He gives it to the reader straight. How else could he explain that by the time this book was published that he had given up stamp collecting and sold his collection.

There appear to be a lot of great books about stamps out there, On my other blog I wrote about the One Cent Magenta. That was a more traditional review. I probably should link some of my posts about stamps and philately that are on my other blog. I will link that post and the adventurous amongst you can type in stamps in the search bar. You will find something.

The book contains the 33 columns he wrote and some excerpts from adventures of the aforementioned Keller–probably his stamp collecting and not his killing. They cover a range of topics and are more personal than historical, perhaps more autobiographical or anecdotal. Being a fan of his other writing makes this even more accessible.

I am enjoying this book and plan to read others in the new year.

Do you have any recommendations of some great books about stamps, stamp collecting/philately?

The last stamp needed

My effort to collect every stamp from 1970 got a boost today.  The last stamp I needed to finish my collection of Egyptian stamps for that year finally arrived….and what a strange trip it has been.

I bought what was advertised as the complete year on Ebay.  Sadly, it was missing two stamps, one of which was quite expensive and one of which was moderately priced.  I should have returned the whole set and written a bad review of the seller.  Instead, I took a substantial discount and bided my time.

I managed to collect the more expensive one a few months later.  The less expensive one proved to be a bit more elusive.  There were lots of sellers, but it was hard to justify paying as much for shipping as it was for the stamp.  I had to wait until I found a seller who also had some other things that I wanted.

Come to think of it, maybe that is the ploy.  They have a substantial shipping cost, which forces me to buy more to “make it worth my while”.  I should probably feel a bit duped, but instead, I am so happy to tick off that country in my collection.

I found a seller that was having a sale and bought a bunch of Canadian stamps to fill in some holes in my collection.  This seller also had the elusive Egyptian stamp.  I probably spent more than I wanted to–but that happens all the time.  It happens on the computer and it happens at shows.

The stamp itself is quite interesting and surprisingly large.  It might very well be the largest single stamp I have in my collection.

They Cancelled the Show

stamps iranOf course with the Coronavirus, or Covid-19, they  had to cancel the stamp and coin show.  It just that twice a year I look forward to going.  The atmosphere is great and I usually make some good progress on my 1970’s project.  I also get tempted by lots of other shiny things that are not at all connected to my project and cause me to spend money that I shouldn’t–but that probably happens to all of us.

Instead, I am spending lots of time online looking at stamps to buy and wondering if the shipping cost is making it too expensive?  Then I try to group a bunch of stuff together…and then I end up spending too much money, or abandoning the idea till another day.

I am keeping busy today by updating my stamp have and don’t have list for the 1970’s project.  I would have done it just before the show…but there was no show.  I wish there were a program that could make a better checklist for me. Maybe if I forked out the money for EZstamp.  If that price wasn’t in US dollars I probably would have done in months ago.

Happy collecting everyone.  I am sure more people are finding time to devote to their stamps now that we are locked inside.  I know I am.

Most Recent Purchase:  about twenty stamps from Iran for the 1970’s project.  They might take a while to arrive, but I’ve got patience.

A Shoebox Full of Stamps

20190810_130907

When one of my friends heard about my “new” hobby of stamp collecting, he related that his mother used to collect stamps but that she sold her collection before they moved. He also related that she had given his son a few of the stamps she didn’t sell.  We talked about it briefly and then moved on to other topics.  This was probably almost a year ago and I didn’t think of it much.  This move happened long before I took up stamp collecting.

Well, on Thursday, while I was out with my two best friends, sitting on the patio of a run down, but cool for it’s anti hipster vibe, that same friend said,  “I have a gift for you.”

It wasn’t my birthday, and I don’t recall doing anything that warranted a gift of any kind. However, it would be rude to say no to a gift.  He handed me a shoe box and told me to open it.

From the photo above, you can see that what he gave me was a shoebox full of stamps. We went over the story of his mother and her collection and his son’s reaction to the gift.  It turns out that he wasn’t interested and they languished away somewhere.  In a recent purge, they were rediscovered.  His son still had no interest, so he allowed them to be given to me.

I was flabbergasted–and I do not use that term lightly. My friend said that these were ones that she didn’t sell and I shouldn’t expect to come across anything of great value.  I was just so glad to be thought of.  I am also attracted to the mystery of it.  Even if there is nothing of “value” in monetary terms, I am sure I will find some stamps that I think are interesting.  That is really what I really value.  It might even open up new areas of collecting for me.

I haven’t looked through the box at all. I got home late that night and went to bed.  The next night, I was exhausted from the night before and went to bed and slept way too long.  I am battling a cold and I am trying to recover.

I am really looking forward to looking through the box. Based on the volume, I am sure it will take me most of the autumn and winter to get through it.

Has this ever happened to you?

Auction Woes

assorted colored vietnam postage stamps

Photo by Bich Tran on Pexels.com

With only one day to go until it ended, I succumbed to the temptation of another stamp auction.  This one had lots of early Canadian stamps that would go so well in my collection, and help me fill up all those empty pages at the beginning of the book.

It sounded great. However these was some reluctance on my part.  The shipping cost was rather high.  It was about seven US dollars, plus 50 cents for the next stamp, and 50 cents for every subsequent stamp.  I know most of these people send it with postage they got at a reduced price, so I thought this was a bit out of line.

The temptation proved to be too great and I plunged in on the night before it ended. I reasoned that I had better win a bunch of stamps to make it worth the shipping costs.  So I dropped a bunch of bid on the stamps I thought I could afford.  I also put down some higher maximum bids to discourage poachers.

This morning, just after I got to work, my phone dinged that I had been outbid on one of the items. This continued throughout the day.  By the time I got back home, my bidding had been whittled down to three items.  It was then I felt a bit of a conundrum. The three stamps didn’t even amount to 50 cents.  However, I would have to pay 8 dollars in shipping.  I either had to up my bids on some of the items, or just accept it.

Well, before long, I was outbid on the remaining three items and I was free of this auction. I wanted the stamps, but I wasn’t able to get them.  I have to say I was relieved.